About Our Young Eagles Program

The EAA Young Eagles program was launched in 1992 to give interested young people, ages 8 - 17, an opportunity to go flying in a general aviation airplane. These flights are offered free of charge and are made possible through the generosity of EAA member volunteers.

Since 1992, more than 1.6 million Young Eagles have enjoyed a flight through the program. EAA Chapter 1252 has flown over 1000 Young Eagles. There are many dedicated chapter members that make it possible.

Each year EAA Chapter 1252 awards a scholarship to area young people to attend the Air Academy in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The EAA Young Eagles Air Academy is designed as an introduction to the wonderful world of aviation. This program uses small group activities and close counselor relationships to present the basics of flight in a science camp format that is a unique combination of fun and discovery.

A Young Eagle’s pilot is a rare breed. They donate their time, their aircraft, and all the fuel. It is not an inexpensive endeavour. EAA Chapter 1252 is honored to have such a great Army of Pilots that wish to share their passion for aviation with kids and adults in the Northeast Ohio area. The people on this page are EAA Chapter 1252’s Young Eagles Army, past and present. EAA Chapter 1252 will always be grateful to each and every one of them.

Can a Young Eagles flight change a young person’s life? Click Here to read a story about one of EAA Chapter 1252’s Young Eagles, Mackenzie Kiesel.

Mike McCoy
EAA Chapter 1252's Young Eagles Coordinator is Mike McCoy. Mike developed and perfected EAA Chapter 1252's Young Eagles Flight Load system so well that the boarding and deplaning of passengers and all the paperwork that goes with each flight is seamless and uninterrupted. Each year alone Mike submits to EAA national over 200 Young Eagles forms and Adult Orientation Rides.

Mike has a deep passion for aviation, but has not had the time to finish up his dream of getting his pilot's license and becoming another Young Eagles Pilot. However, Mike is experiencing that joy by supporting his daughters Kelly and Casey in their aviation careers.  

Kelly McCoy
Kelly McCoy was EAA Chapter 1252's Youngest Young Eagles Pilot. A Young Eagle herself, Kelly decided to pursue her dream of becoming a pilot by attending Ohio University. Kelly flew her first Young Eagle at EAA Chapter 1252’s Pancake Breakfast and Young Eagles Rally. Kelly continues to follow her dream and is now a professional pilot in the Pacific Northwest.

 

Paul Hancheck - Young Eagle Pilot

Paul's 1946 Luscomb

Ray Ebner - Young Eagle Pilot

Ray's Cessna Cardinal

Larry Kenyon - Young Eagle Pilot

Cessna 182 Skylane

 

Paul Koziol - Young Eagle Pilot

Piper Cub

 

Discover Aviation Center Flying Club

Thanks to all the club pilots for flying Young Eagles

Cessna 172 Skyhawk

Discover Aviation Center Flying Club

Thanks to all the club pilots for flying Young Eagles

 

Piper Tomahawk 2-seat Trainer

 

Joe Lipovits
No one can catch up to Joe Lipovits! He's the EAA Chapter 1252 Young Eagle's Master! Words cannot discribe Joe's generosity. He has flown over 400 Young Eagles.

Joe helping Young Eagles board his Cessna 172 Skyhawk
Joe Lipovits stands by his plane with Madison, Emerson and Logan Minch after their flight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following story by Susan Ketcham appeared in the Sun News March 30, 2012.

Joseph Lipovits of Middleburg Heights knows all about paying it forward, only in his case, it is paying it upward.

Joe was a young Hungarian immigrant in 1968, working as a carpenter, when someone took him on his first flight.

“It was a World War II trainer, a 1948 Navion,” Lipovits said. “Later that year I started taking lessons on a Piper Colt.”

The experience left him with a lifelong love of flying, but it took awhile to earn his license. He was a busy man, beginning his own company, Lipovits Construction, raising a family with his wife, Manci, and building his own home, one of more than 200 he built in the Indian Creek area of Middleburg Heights.

After about two years of lessons, he finally earned his visual certification. Later, he and a friend bought a Navion similar to the one he flew in for that first flight.

His son now handles the business, although Lipovits still helps out. The more relaxed schedule allows him to fly his current plane, a Cessna 172, about once a week, depending on the weather. And, with more than 2,000 hours in the cockpit, Lipovits shares his passion with area children through the Young Eagles program.

The YE flights are offered several times a year through the local chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association, (EAA 1252) based in Columbia Station airport. The program’s aim is to introduce a new generation to the world of flight. To date, he has taken over 400 children into the Cleveland airspace.

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Joseph Lipovits of Middleburg Heights knows all about paying it forward, only in his case, it is paying it upward.

Lipovits, 76, was a young Hungarian immigrant in 1968, working as a carpenter, when someone took him on his first flight.

“It was a World War II trainer, a 1948 Navion,” Lipovits said. “Later that year I started taking lessons on a Piper Colt.”

The experience left him with a lifelong love of flying, but it took awhile to earn his license. He was a busy man, beginning his own company, Lipovits Construction, raising a family with his wife, Manci, and building his own home, one of more than 200 he built in the Indian Creek area of Middleburg Heights.

After about two years of lessons, he finally earned his visual certification. Later, he and a friend bought a Navion similar to the one he flew in for that first flight.

His son now handles the business, although Lipovits still helps out. The more relaxed schedule allows him to fly his current plane, a Cessna 172, about once a week, depending on the weather. And, with more than 2,000 hours in the cockpit, Lipovits shares his passion with area children through the Young Eagles program.

The YE flights are offered four times a year through the local chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association, based at the Columbia Station airport. The program’s aim is to introduce a new generation to the world of flight. To date, he has taken about 350 children into the Cleveland airspace.

“Sometimes we have as many as 50 kids go up in one day. I usually take three kids at a time,” he said.

The children enjoy his flights because he offers the children headsets. He also offers the youngsters a chance to take the controls.

“I will pull the yoke and let them go up 100 feet. Then I show them how to make a slow turn,” he said. “They always want more.”

Last year he took his neighbors, Luke and Michael Watson, on one of the flights. Michael, 8, in the back seat, enjoyed watching the ground get smaller and their parents, Angela and Michael Watson, get farther and father away.

“It was fun, but I wished it was a jet,” Michael said.

Luke, 9, sat next to Lipovits and got to hold the controls.

“I thought it was cool. When you went up, you could see things from a better heights,” he said.

Lipovits is required to keep the flights away from Hopkins airspace, so he usually heads west, nearly to Cedar Point, pointing out landmarks along the way. Luke remembers seeing a heart-shaped lake in Columbia Station and the Grafton jail.

“It was fun landing,” he said. “I want to go again and again and again.”

That is the point, Lipovits said. The group also sponsors students to go to aviation camp in Oshkosh, Wisc., and takes an annual trip to an air show in Florida. Some children who have taken flights through the group have gone on to become pilots or air traffic controllers for commercial airlines or the military.

“We even had one who became an astronaut,” he said.